With increasing globalization distinctions between the domestic and the international fade. Numerous regulatory decisions, once decided domestically, are influenced, even shaped, by international institutions and international law. These processes also impact Israel and the entire Middle East region.

Israel is particularly exposed to the forces of globalization being open to international trade and subject to scrutiny by external actors for its policies. Israel is also a major contributor to the evolution of international law mainly through the sophisticated and groundbreaking decisions of the Israeli Supreme Court that resonate throughout the world and command attention and respect. Israeli scholarship on international law stands at the cutting edge of the study of international law and is widely respected.

The goal of the Global Governance & Human Rights Track is to provide students with tools that will enable them to identify and explore the emerging global regulatory regimes in the fields of human rights and humanitarian law, environmental and cultural heritage protection, trade and investment regulation, and other fields, and to assess the normative challenges that these regime pose to our democratic sensibilities and reflect on the possibilities for shaping these global institutions and their policies through accountability requirements of transparency, participation, reason-giving, liability, and judicial review. The track is therefore attractive not only to students interested in international law but also to those whose passion is constitutional law and administrative law and wish to gain tools to address problems of public law and policy in an era of global interdependency. TAU Law has strong reputation in these fields of law.

In addition to our professors who teach international law, many in our Faculty are committed to exploring law from a transnational perspective: traditional subjects such as constitutional law, administrative law, criminal law, labor law, tax law, environmental law, are taught with an eye to the global legal aspects. This breath of research is reflected in the wide selection of courses offered to the students taking this track.

In addition to the year-long seminar Obligation of States to Foreign Stakeholders with Professor Benvenisti, and the International Law Workshop in the Spring Semester, students could choose among courses focusing on constitutional and human rights (Professors Bilsky, Dyzenhaus, Eltis, Lustig, Perelman, Pfander, Schragger and Goluboff), international humanitarian law (Professors Benvenisti, Shraga, Stone), international environmental law (Professor Bodansky) refugee law (Professor Aiken), the global monetary architecture (Professor Kreitner) and international tax law (Professor Margaliot).