Every student must complete one workshop. The professors and courses refer to the 2015-2016 academic year - please be aware that courses and professors change each year. 

  • Information Technology Law
  • International Law
  • Law and Economics
  • Law and History
  • Law and Political Thought
  • Private Law Theory

Workshop: Information Technology Law
Professor Michael Birnhack, Professor Assaf Jacob
Digital networks have an almost infinite number of speech opportunities, communications, commerce and more, but also posed substantial challenges of copyright infringement, privacy violations, harm to one's reputation, terrorist activity, scams and more. What is the relationship between law and information technologies? This is the topic of the workshop. The workshop invites experts from Israel and abroad to present their current work, from law and other relevant disciplines. We will discuss these issues by way of critically reading several yet-unpublished works in progress on cutting edge topics, and then discussing the papers with the authors. This is an advanced seminar and assumes prior familiarity with the general themes of law and technology.
**Students in the Law & Technology track of the International LL.M program are expected to take the workshop.

Workshop: International Law
Professor Eyal Benvenisti, Professor Aeyal Gross, Dr. Doreen Lustig
Tel Aviv University International Law Workshop serves as a forum in which leading international law scholars, from Israel and abroad, present their works in progress and address past and contemporary challenges to international law. The workshop also provides TAU students (including LL.M. and Ph.D students) with the opportunity to read and comment on presented and classic texts. Students are assigned to write eight reaction papers and engage with the authors during the workshop's sessions.
Prerequisites: International Law.

Workshop: Law & Economics
Professor Avraham Tabbach & Dr. Shay Lavie
This workshop will provide students the opportunity to engage with ongoing research in the economic analysis of law, written by leading worldwide scholars. At most of the meetings, invited speakers will present works in progress, and an in-class discussion will follow. Students are required to read, before sessions, the papers to be presented and to submit brief written comments on eight papers throughout the semester. Grades will be based on the written comments’ quality as well as class participation. Enrollment is permitted to students who have completed their first year in law school; as topics change, students may take the workshop multiple times.

Workshop: Law and History
Professor Ron Harris, Professor Assaf Likhovski & Dr. Lena Salaymeh
The legal history workshop presents a wide range of topics, research questions, and methodological issues. The course will mainly consist of weekly meetings in which leading scholars from Israel and abroad will discuss their works-in-progress. Participants will gain insight into the mechanics and dilemmas of legal history research and writing, exposure to current trends in the field, and experience in critiquing scholarship effectively and fairly. In addition to being graded on class participation, students will be required to write several short (2-page) critiques of the articles.

Workshop: Law & Political Thought: Critiques of Secularism
Professor Shai Lavi, Dr. Lena Salaymeh, Dr. Khaled Furani
The theme of the Spring 2016 Law & Political Thought Workshop is Critiquing Secularism. The Workshop will present a wide range of topics, research questions, and methodological issues at the intersection of secularism, religion, and law. The course will consist of several introductory meetings to provide a framework for approaching issues related to the interaction of law, religion, and secularism. In subsequent meetings, leading scholars from Israel and abroad will discuss their works-in-progress. Participants will gain insight into the mechanics and dilemmas of religious and secular legal issues, exposure to current trends in the field, and experience in critiquing scholarship effectively and fairly. In addition to being graded on class participation, students will be required to write several short (2-page) critiques of the work-in-progress articles presented by our guests.

Workshop: Private Law Theory
Professor Hanoch Dagan, Professor Roy Kreitner
The Private Law Theory Workshop is a forum for ongoing scholarly research in private law and a Law Faculty course. The Workshop presents new scholarship on topics in and around contract, torts, property, and unjust enrichment. Students who take the workshop for credit submit written comments —in English or in Hebrew— on the papers presented. Sessions include a brief presentation followed by an open discussion (q. & a.) with the participation of students and faculty. The discussions will proceed under the assumption that the presented paper has been read carefully by all the participants.